STOP: Stop Tar Sands Operations Permanently

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Stampede Action Speaks to Tar Sands Trouble

Posted by mhudema on July 7, 2008

F.decorate(_ge(‘photo_notes’), F._photo_notes).notes_go_go_go(2636754951, ‘http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3182/2636754951_f1aeb4a4ec_t.jpg’, ‘3.1444’); 

51.047248-114.061989

<!– Speak no Tarsands 2008 Every year, Calgary, Alberta hosts the Stampede Parade to commemorate the start of the Calgary Stampede. The Stampede is a 10-day long &quot;fair&quot; which seeks to celebrate Calgary (and Alberta’s) ranching and farming heritage. Seemingly everyone in the city dons cowboy attire (Jeans, at the very least) and there are Stampede breakfasts, lunches, and parties all over the city for the duration. of Stampede However, Alberta is now synonymous with &quot;oil&quot; rather than ranching – moreso, unconventional oil from the Tarsands. Alberta’s tarsands or &quot;oilsands&quot; as the industry prefer to call them are said to have the 2nd largest reserves of oil outside of Saudi Arabia. However, the Tarsands have been labelled &quot;The Most Destructive Project on Earth&quot; in part, because of the enormous area that Tarsands developments irrevocably harm or destroy but also in part because of the extraordinary volume of CO2 emissions released into the atmosphere (equivalent to 10,000,000 extra cars on the road, every year) in the process of extracting the Bitumen. More information can be found at the links below. In these photos, we took part in a &quot;Hear no Evil, See no Evil, Speak no Evil&quot; demonstration along the parade route. The response from the crowd and the float participants was overwhelmingly positive, surprisingly. Many of the parade participants would realize our presence, read the shirts and view the photos and then excitedly turn to the people around them and point us out, and even sometimes cheer or give us the thumbs up. The crowds were taking photos and video as well. Politicians can’t resist a good parade, of course, thus we were also successful in soliciting positive responses – and, at the very least, awareness – from many of the dozens of municipal, provincial, and federal politicians as they passed by. All in all, an extremely positive experience and effective tool for awareness. <a href="http://environmentaldefence.ca">environmentaldefence.ca</a&gt; <a href="http://www.travelingalberta.com">www.travelingalberta.com</a&gt; <a href="http://www.tarsandstruth.org">www.tarsandstruth.org</a&gt; <a href="http://www.ualberta.ca/PARKLAND/">www.ualberta.ca/PARKLAND/</a&gt; <a href="http://www.tarsandstimeout.ca/">www.tarsandstimeout.ca/</a&gt; <a href="http://www.tarsandswatch.org">www.tarsandswatch.org</a&gt; <a href="http://www.ecojustice.ca/">www.ecojustice.ca/</a&gt; ItzaFineDay ItzaFineDay

–>Every year, Calgary, Alberta hosts the Stampede Parade to commemorate the start of the Calgary Stampede. The Stampede is a 10-day long “fair” which seeks to celebrate Calgary (and Alberta’s) ranching and farming heritage. Seemingly everyone in the city dons cowboy attire (Jeans, at the very least) and there are Stampede breakfasts, lunches, and parties all over the city for the duration. of Stampede

However, Alberta is now synonymous with “oil” rather than ranching – moreso, unconventional oil from the Tarsands. Alberta’s tarsands or “oilsands” as the industry prefer to call them are said to have the 2nd largest reserves of oil outside of Saudi Arabia.

However, the Tarsands have been labelled “The Most Destructive Project on Earth” in part, because of the enormous area that Tarsands developments irrevocably harm or destroy but also in part because of the extraordinary volume of CO2 emissions released into the atmosphere (equivalent to 10,000,000 extra cars on the road, every year) in the process of extracting the Bitumen.

More information can be found at the links below.

In these photos, (http://www.flickr.com/photos/itzafineday/2636754951/in/photostream/) we took part in a “Hear no Evil, See no Evil, Speak no Evil” demonstration along the parade route. The response from the crowd and the float participants was overwhelmingly positive, surprisingly. Many of the parade participants would realize our presence, read the shirts and view the photos and then excitedly turn to the people around them and point us out, and even sometimes cheer or give us the thumbs up. The crowds were taking photos and video as well.

Politicians can’t resist a good parade, of course, thus we were also successful in soliciting positive responses – and, at the very least, awareness – from many of the dozens of municipal, provincial, and federal politicians as they passed by.

All in all, an extremely positive experience and effective tool for awareness.

http://www.greenpeace.org/tarsands
environmentaldefence.ca
www.travelingalberta.com
www.tarsandstruth.org
www.ualberta.ca/PARKLAND/
www.tarsandstimeout.ca/
www.tarsandswatch.org
www.ecojustice.ca/

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