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Posts Tagged ‘impacts’

Climate Change hits Below the Belt

Posted by mhudema on July 16, 2008


Global warming to hit nether regions

PATRICK WHITE

From Tuesday’s Globe and Mail

July 15, 2008 at 10:17 AM EDT

We all know that global climate change is heating sensitive ecological regions around the world. Now U.S. researchers are predicting it will bring a burning sensation to some sensitive human regions.

Researchers at the University of Texas say global warming will trigger a dramatic rise in kidney stones in the United States.

According to their study, warming temperatures over the next 42 years will cause a 30-per-cent jump in cases of nephrolithiasis, or kidney stone disease, in some regions of the country.

“This will come and get you in your home,” said Tom Brikowski, lead researcher and an associate professor of geosciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. “It will make life just uncomfortable enough that maybe people will slow down and think what they’re doing to the climate.”

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Climate Changes Effects on Alberta

Posted by mhudema on July 11, 2008

Forest fires, drought, disease
Climate change study warns province to prepare for spike in natural disasters
Keith Gerein
The Edmonton Journal
A farmer cuts his drought-stunted oat crop near Cochrane in 2002. A report warns Alberta is headed for more of the same.
CREDIT: Reuters, file
A farmer cuts his drought-stunted oat crop near Cochrane in 2002. A report warns Alberta is headed for more of the same.

EDMONTON – More forest fires, unreliable water supplies, volatile farming conditions and the emergence of unfamiliar diseases — these are among the impacts Albertans can expect from a warming climate, a new report to the provincial government says.

The three-year study, one of the first to assess the vulnerability of Alberta’s communities and industries to climate change, suggests the province must act quickly with new infrastructure and planning if it hopes to successfully adapt to the changing conditions.

“The message is that we will still be able to enjoy a high quality of life, but we must move forward with adaptation and mitigation strategies starting today,” said University of Alberta researcher Debra Davidson, one of the lead authors.

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